Ideas for Ending Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Tracey Spicer, an Australian broadcaster and author, asked members of her vast social media network to suggest ways to end sexual harassment in the workplace.

And she got some interesting responses that are worthy of consideration here. The list was published recently by the web site of an Australian lifestyle network called NineHoney. 

What follows are just a few of the ideas. Those that I deem particular worthy are in bold:

  • Clearly define what comes under the umbrella of sexual harassment;
  • Teach children and parents about consent as part of a school program;
  • Re-frame the concept of what it is to be a good man – teach men to be better bystanders;
  • Empower HR Departments to take action if women are at risk;
  • The board and top executives should commit to a zero tolerance policy;
  • Sexual harassment should be a standing agenda item at board/management meetings
  • Companies should file a mandatory annual report of policies, sexual harassment instances and penalties. In Australia, the report would be filed with the Workplace Gender Equality Agency. There is no equivalent public agency in the United States though the EEOC is responsible for implementing federal laws governing sexual harassment;
  • Permit employees to report sexual harassment through an “external” or outside “portal”;
  • Track repeat offenders over time, through multiple workplaces;
  • Consider making non-disclosure agreements legally void;
  • Create a universally accepted protocol for reporting sexual harassment, with protection for whistle blowers;
  • Legislate criminal charges for company directors who cover up sexual harassment.
  • Extend the statute of limitations for filing a civil case alleging sexual harassment.
  • Consider an inquiry, summit or commission to assess the scale of the problem and consider solutions.
  • Access to free support, counseling for victims.

Spicer, who is herself a victim of sexual harassment, has launched an investigation of the problem in Australia and has compiled accounts of sexual harassment from more than 400 sexual harassment victims. She recently reported that she is now the target of death threats.

America’s Third World Court

US Supreme Ct Insists on Obscurity

United States: The leader of the federal court system of the world’s greatest democracy, the U.S. Supreme Court, refuses to allow its proceedings to be televised.  Television is an archaic technology that dates back to the 1920s. . Refusing to be televised is akin to insisting in 1440 that the bible be pen8037-25ned by monks in ink, longhand, rather than  using the newfangled Gutenberg printing press. Our high court’s annual rulings are initially handed out on paper by the court’s public relations staff and then posted on its web site.

Meanwhile …

Victoria, Australia: The Supreme Court of Victoria this month  announced a plan to launch several new technology initiatives.  Here are some of its goals:

  • The Court will become fully paperless by 2016.
  • It is recruiting retired judges to blog for the court.
  • The court is  developing an interactive website. Viewers can watch Video on Demand, download judgment summaries and judgments, leave comments on the Supreme Court News website, and participate in an Internet Forum.
  • The Court just launched a Facebook page last week and already has a Twitter feed with nearly 2500 followers.
  • The Court plans to look at other social media opportunities such as LinkedIn.

According to the Hon. Marilyn Warren, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Victoria:

“It’s about openness so the community can see and know what we do in the courts, it’s also a way for the courts to make sure that the community are appropriately informed of what happens in court, the reality about the cases, not the story in the media that the editors want to put out, the community can read that, but they should know the actual facts.”

Moreover, Judge Warren notes that at one time the print media assigned skilled legal affairs reporters to cover the courts but in this era of cutbacks there are fewer and fewer court reporters to inform the public about the court’s proceedings. “The opportunity for the public to see what the courts do unmediated by journalists and editors may go a long way towards educating the public about the role of the judiciary. It is also a way of reaching younger generations,” she added.

Fortunately, some state courts in the United States are slightly more progressive than the U.S. Supreme Court.  According to a survey by the Conference of Court  Public Information Officers, almost 12 percent of state courts at least use Facebook.

 

Where is America’s Age Discrimination Commissioner?

Australia, a world leader in combating workplace bullying, recently announced the appointment of Australia’s first Age Discrimination Commissioner.

Despite the fact that age discrimination is epidemic in the United States, it appears the problem is being  ignored by the federal government and non-profit advocacy agencies like the American Association for Retired Persons (one of the country’s leading medical insurers).

Australia announced tn July 2011 the appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner  to combat age discrimination in Australian workplaces and the wider community.

Where is America’s age discrimination commissioner?

The current economic climate in the United States is like a “perfect storm” for older workers. There is record unemployment for workers aged 55 and above and there is record age discrimination.

The impact of unemployment on older workers is dire as they face potentially decades of retirement, and health issues, without the ability to prepare financially.  Older workers do not have the time and may never recover from the adverse impact of age discrimination.

Age discrimination complaints to the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission  are at an all-time high.  In five years, the number of age discrimination complaints has increased FORTY PERCENT.  There were 23,264 age discrimination complaints filed with the EEOC in 2010.

Meanwhile, the  Bureau of Justice Statistics(BJS) reports that unemployment for persons aged 55 and above has increased sharply since the beginning of the recession in December 2007. The jobless rate among older workers was 7.1 percent (seasonally adjusted) in February 2010, just shy of the record-high level of 7.2 percent in December 2009.

In addition, the BJS says that older workers remain unemployed longer than younger workers. The BJS states that nearly half (49.1 percent) of older jobseekers had been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer in February 2010, compared with 28.5 percent of workers aged 16 to 24 years and 41.3 percent of workers aged 25 to 54 years.

(According to a 2011  CareerBuilder survey on workplace bullying,  women aged 55 and above are more likely than any other demographic group to  report feeling bullied in the workplace, another problem America ignores.)

Australia’s new age commissioner, the Hon. Susan Ryan, will operate under he auspices of the Australia Age Discrimination Act, and will tackle issues such as discrimination in getting job or applying for a promotion, enrolling at a university, applying to rent a house, or using services such as at a bank. The government provided $4 million in funding over four years to the Australian Human Rights Commission to support the new position.

Australia was one of the first countries to recognize the problem of workplace bullying, which causes potentially severe  injury to a target’s mental and physical health, destroys families and costs the United States billions each year in needless turnover, lost work, higher health costs, absenteeism, etc.  In fact, in Victoria, Australia, workplace bullying is considered a criminal offense under some circumstances.

At this point, it may go without saying that America has yet to offer workers any protection against workplace bullying.