Frank Talk To Prospective Job Applicants or Discrimination?

 

Sonya Duhé

When I was in law school, a petite young woman asked a professor a question in class in a voice that can be accurately described as a “tiny.”

“If you want to be an attorney, ” the professor bellowed, “You need to speak with power and authority. You may want to rethink whether the law is right for you.” 

One can imagine Sonya Forte Duhé offering advice in a similar vein as the chair of Loyola University’s School of Communication and Design.

Duhé was set to take over July 1 as the dean of the Arizona State University (ASU) journalism school and as chief executive officer of Arizona’s PBS station. But ASU recently retracted its job offer. She had already left Loyola in anticipation of the new job and is now unemployed. Continue reading “Frank Talk To Prospective Job Applicants or Discrimination?”

Civility and the White House Press Corps

A reporter becomes involved in a  physical contest over the control of the microphone at a presidential press conference, ignoring the objections of the President and swatting away a young female White House intern.

CNN Anchor Jim Acosta was insisting that President Trump respond to his questions about what Trump characterizes as an “invasion”  of groups of migrants who are traveling through Mexico to the U.S. southern border. Acosta  disagreed with Trump’s characterization. After several minutes of back and forth, the President tried to entertain other questions. Acosta  refused to yield the microphone.

A lot of people voted for Pres. Trump; No one, to my knowledge, voted for  Acosta

Continue reading “Civility and the White House Press Corps”