U.S. Judge Dismisses Free Speech/Free Press Claim

The Selection Officer for the SSA says one reason he didn’t hire the plaintiff (me) is because she (I) wrote an employment law blog on workplace abuse.

Chief U.S. District Judge Miranda Du of Nevada this week dismissed a claim in a lawsuit that I filed against the Social Security Administration (SSA), after it rejected me for a job for which I was superbly qualified in the aftermath of the Great Recession (2011).

A novice SSA Selection Officer said one reason he didn’t select me for hire was because he thought my fledgling employment law blog, When the Abuser Goes to Work, was a “red flag” and he was concerned I might one day question his management skills.

I began the blog as a public service in connection with my book, Surviving Bullies, Queen Bees & Psychopaths in the Workplace. The blog, syndicated by Newstek, is legally and unquestionably a work of journalism.

The shocking age discrimination I experienced when I applied for the SSA job in Reno, NV, in the waning days of the Great Recession, prompted me to research age discrimination and write my groundbreaking book, Betrayed: The Legalization of Age Discrimination in the Workplace.

A few tibits – 26 applicants (all but one under the age of 40) responded to a ridiculously narrow recruitment for five attorney vacancies. I found out about the vacancies by chance when I saw an announcement on USAJobs for a different job at the Reno office. The SSA repeatedly tried to hire five candidates under the age of 40 but was thwarted when candidates rejected job offers. The ninth selectee was the only other candidate over the age of 40 (a 47-year-old male).

The SSA says the candidates were hired based on “personality” and “cultural fit.”

In 2019, Judge Du dismissed the entire case, calling it futile, and issued her ruling with prejudice (barring me from refiling the case).

The Ninth Circuit

I filed an appeal with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, which in 2021 reinstated my claim of systemic age discrimination, finding it “plausible,” and remanded the case back to Judge Du.

The Ninth Circuit, however, dismissed my claims that the SSA retaliated against me for engaging in “oppositional activity” in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967. The oppositional clause prohibits employers from retaliating against job applicants because they oppose or contest unlawful employment practices. The Ninth Circuit said my blog didn’t qualify as oppositional activity because it did not specifically oppose discrimination by the SSA.

The Ninth Circuit’s ruling left me with no choice but to file a First Amendment complaint against the Selection Officer.

In light of Judge Du’s dismissal of the First Amendment claim, I now have no recourse for what many would consider to be a patently obvious violation of the U.S. Constitutional guarantees of freedom of speech and freedom of the press. And, of course, this ruling doesn’t just affect me.

An Innocent Motive

So here’s why Judge Du dismissed my First Amendment retaliation claim.

She said the Selection Officer was acting in his official capacity and then expressed concern that hordes of disappointed job seekers might file First Amendment claims.

Then she wrote in her decision that the Selection Officer had an “innocent motive” for not hiring me.

Initially the Selection Officer said he didn’t hire me because I was not sufficiently “enthusiastic” about the job, despite contrary evidence. I went to far greater lengths to discover and apply for the position than any other applicant. I repeatedly said I was enthusiastic about the job.

According to Judge Du: “[H]e felt she was not sufficiently enthusiastic about the position. This alone is an innocent motive and raises doubt that [the Selection Officer] retaliated against Barnes by not hiring her, solely on the basis that she exercised her right to protected speech.”

Tuesday was World Press Freedom Day but what is freedom when federal courts refuse to enforce the U.S. Constitution on behalf of journalists and anyone else who writes about topics, including worker rights, that make federal bureaucrats uncomfortable.

Marjorie Taylor Greene And America’s Class Divide

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wore a smart blue mask with white rectangles that matched her fashionable suit with a zip up jacket.

In a contemptuous voice, she called freshman GOP U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, D-GA, a “threat,” and a “QAnon adherent,” “9/11 truther,” “harasser of child survivors of school shootings.”

That’s why, she said, Democrats were taking the extraordinary, unprecedented step of stripping Greene, a Republican,  of her committee assignments.

“Who would imagine,” Pelosi asked, “that [Republican leadership] would put such a person on the education committee?”

Democrats have spent a lot of time in recent months talking about America’s racial divide but Green represents another kind of divide, the class divide.

Pelosi, one of America’s true elites, probably can’t imagine what motivates Greene (or voters in Greene’s district).

Greene was not born with a silver spoon in her mouth. She did not graduate from Yale or Harvard. And she’s from the deep south, Milledgeville, GA, which is just about as far as you can get from the beltway.

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Appeals Court Says ‘Bye to English Teacher Blogger

The First Amendment took a beating recently when a federal appeals court panel in Philadelphia, PA,  upheld the dismissal of an English teacher who wrote a semi-anonymous blog containing satirical observations about modern-day teaching at an affluent suburban high school.

Natalie Munroe was hired in 2006 by Central Bucks East High School in Doylestown, PA, earned tenure, and received excellent evaluations. But she became increasingly frustrated with student behavior,  especially with respect to academic integrity and honor, and lack of parental support for teachers. In 2009 she began a personal blog under the name “Natalie M’ that was called, “Where are we going, and why are we in this handbasket?”  The blog was intended for family and friends and had fewer than a dozen subscribers, including Munroe and her husband.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit noted forebodingly in its ruling that “no password was required to access the blog.”

Munroe was suspended after a local reporter asked a  school official in February 2011  if he was aware that students apparently were circulating material from the blog on Facebook and other social media. Her suspension led to national media attention that inflamed the controversy. Principal  Abram Lucabaugh estimated that 200 parents told the district they did not want Munroe to teach their children.  Munroe was fired in June 2012.

In a 2-1 ruling, the appellate panel upheld the dismissal of Munroe’s lawsuit in which she alleged her termination was retaliatory and violated her right to free speech . The majority said public employees are entitled to discuss issues of “public concern” but the state may impose speech restrictions on public employees that are necessary for efficient and effective operations.  Although most of Munroe’s 84 blog entries had nothing at all to do with her work, the majority said Munroe’s speech was sufficiently disruptive to the school to diminish any legitimate interest in its expression. The lone dissenter observed  the majority had “ducked’ the fact that Munroe’s media appearances and interviews contributed to her discharge and said that a jury should decide whether Munroe’s speech was protected by the First Amendment.  He maintained the school district “forfeited its right to match its operational interests against Munroe’s free speech interests” when it waited two years to fire her and failed to transfer her to another school.

The stated reason for Munroe’s dismissal was  “incompetency” even though she was obviously a better-than-average English teacher. She was a good writer. Her comments were pointed but funny and thought-provoking. And she cared.

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