Workplace Bullying Increasing

A new study by CareerBuilder finds that workplace bullying is on the rise, with 35 percent of workers reporting they have felt bullied on the job, up from 27 percent last year.

 Sixteen percent of these workers reported they suffered health-related problems as a result of bullying and 17 percent decided to quit their jobs to escape the situation.

 The study  found the majority of incidents go unreported.  Twenty-seven percent of  targets said they reported the bullying to their Human Resources department. Of these workers, 43 percent reported that action was taken while 57 percent said nothing was done.

 The scientific  survey was conducted online  by Harris Interactive from May 14 to June 4, 2012 and included more than 3,800 workers nationwide.

 Who Are the Bullies?

 Of workers who felt bullied, 48 percent pointed to incidents with their bosses and 26 percent to someone higher up in the company. Forty-five percent said the bullies were coworkers  while 31 percent were picked on by customers. 

 More than half (54 percent) of those bullied said they were bullied by someone older than they were, while 29 percent said the bully was younger.

 Weapons of a Workplace Bully

 The most common way workers reported being bullied was getting blamed for mistakes they didn’t make followed by not being acknowledged and the use of double standards. The full list includes:

  • Falsely accused of mistakes – 42 percent
  • Ignored – 39 percent
  • Used different standards/policies toward me than other workers – 36 percent
  • Constantly criticized – 33 percent
  • Someone didn’t perform certain duties, which negatively impacted my work – 31 percent
  • Yelled at by boss in front of coworkers – 28 percent
  • Belittling comments were made about my work during meetings – 24 percent
  • Gossiped about – 26 percent
  • Someone stole credit for my work – 19 percent
  • Purposely excluded from projects or meetings – 18 percent
  • Picked on for personal attributes – 15 percent

Standing Up to the Bully

 About half (49 percent) of victims reported confronting the bully themselves, while 51 percent did not. Of those who confronted the bully, half (50 percent) said the bullying stopped while 11 percent said it got worse, and 38 percent said the bullying didn’t change at all.

The company offers the following tips for workers who are feeling bullied:

  1. Keep record of all incidents of bullying, documenting places, times, what happened and who was present.
  2. Consider talking to the bully, providing examples of how you felt treated unfairly. Chances are the bully may not be aware that he/she is making you feel this way. (Personally, I disagree.  Most bullies know exactly what they are doing. A small percentage are actually psychopaths ,completley lacking in empathy.  Use your judgment when confronting a bully – it may work but it also could escalate the problem or the bully could lay low until he/she sees the opportunity to finish the job.) 
  3. Always focus on resolution. When sharing examples with the bully or a company authority, center the discussions around how to make the working situation better or how things could be handled differently.

Surveys consistently show that between a quarter and a third of workers have felt bullied on the job. Furthermore, there is overwhelming research  that workplace bullying can lead to potentially severe mental and physical health problems. Yet, efforts to address the problem in the United States over the past decade have proved fruitless up to now. Meanwhile, many other industrialized countries have adopted regulations or laws to address workplace bullying which place the responsibility upon the employer to insure a safe bully-free workplace for employees.

Readers can sign a petition calling up the Secretary of Labor to take action to address the epidemic of workplace bullying by going here.

CareerBuilder’s on-line site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors, 1 million jobs and 49 million resumes.

 

SIGN PETITION: STOP WORKPLACE BULLYING!

*Alas, this petition is defunct and no longer accepting signatures. It ended with 28,116  signatures. Other workplace anti-bullying petitions have arisen on the internet (i.e., see  Move-On petition  intended for submission to Pres. Trump, the U.S. Congress, Verizon and Massachusetts) –  PGB, 2/28/18

Now you can do something about the epidemic of workplace bullying!

Please sign this petition to ask President Obama and the Secretary of Labor  to formulate uniform national legislation to protect American workers from this widely recognized form of workplace violence.

The petition drive is sponsored by this blog (When the Abuser Goes to Work) and other workplace anti-bully advocates.

Workplace bullying is devastating to the mental and physical health of targets and it costs employees, employers and taxpayers billions each year in lost productivity, absenteeism and health and social welfare costs.

America lags far behind other industrialized countries on this issue. Sweden adopted a workplace anti-bully law in 1993. The 32 countries of the European Union agreed in 2007 to require employers to prevent and protect workers from workplace bullying. Workers in Turkey and Estonia have protection from workplace bullying – why don’t we?

A 2011 survey by CareerBuilder found that 27 percent of American workers report having been bullied in the workplace. The short-term impact of this form of abuse is severe anxiety, depression, insomnia, etc. The long-term impact of high stress is chronic disease,  including cardiovascular disease.

The vast majority of targets have little or no legal recourse. For many, the only hope is to quit and face chronic unemployment.